Why do freedivers use long fins?

Why do freedivers use long fins?

Fins with longer blades are more powerful and responsive than those used for scuba or snorkeling. Long bladed fins make it easier to move through the water.

What are the main freediving disciplines?

What are the main freediving disciplines?

There are eight different competitive freediving disciplines:

Static Apnea (STA) - the diver holds his/her breath floating face down in a swimming pool or confined water area. This is the only discipline where performance is measured on duration, rather than distance or depth.

Dynamic With Fins (DYN) - the first of the pool disciplines that focuses on distance. Here the freediver travels in a horizontal position underwater (typically in a pool), with a propulsion aid such as fins or a monofin, in an effort to cover the greatest distance possible.

Dynamic Without Fins (DNF) - in this discipline the freediver again tries to cover the greatest distance possible in a pool but with no propulsion aids.

Constant Weight (CWT) - this is the most popular depth discipline in freediving. The aim is to achieve the greatest depth possible. The diver descends using either bi-fins or a monofin and typically a small amount of weight. The diver is not allowed to pull on any guide ropes or change the weight used.

Constant Weight Without Fins (CNF) - another depth discipline, however, unlike in CWT the diver is only allowed to use his/her own muscle strength, without the use of propulsion equipment and without pulling on the rope. Constant weight without fins is considered to be the most difficult and pure sportive depth discipline, as it contains no materials to aid descent and requires perfect coordination between movements, equalization, technique and buoyancy.

Free Immersion (FIM) - this discipline is similar to Constant Weight No Fins in that the diver uses only a wetsuit and a small amount of weight, however, it is allowed to pull on the rope during descent and ascent.

Variable Weight (VWT) - here the diver descends with the help of a heavy weight (typically in the form of a sled) to a pre-agreed depth and then ascends to the surface by swimming or pulling on a rope.

No Limit (NLT) - this discipline allows the diver to descend with the help of a heavy weight and ascend using any method of choice - most often a lift bag or a fast counter-balance pulley system. No Limit is the true expression of human endurance underwater, as in this discipline the most advanced divers have managed to descend to depths greater than some submarines can operate.

Are there any special requirements I have to meet to start learn

Are there any special requirements I have to meet to start learning to freedive?

In order to start the freediving course, you have to demonstrate basic water skills and be generally comfortable in the water. You need to be able to swim 200-meters/yards and/or 300-metres/yards using a mask, fins, and snorkel without stopping. There is no time limit for this, and you may use any swimming strokes you want.

In addition to that, all student divers complete a medical history form that aims to check if you have any medical conditions that could be a problem while freediving. If none of these apply, sign the form and you’re ready to start.

I feel pain in my ears when I try to go down underwater, will th

I feel pain in my ears when I try to go down underwater, will this happen when I go freediving?
The pain in your ears when you go underwater is caused by the water pressure pushing on your eardrum. As a part of the course, you will learn to equalize your ears and remove any discomfort. The technique is very safe if done properly and, once you learn it, your ears won’t hurt.

I smoke. Can I freedive?

I smoke. Can I freedive?
Yes, you can freedive, but because smoking can affect your physical stability, it is not advisable to smoke during the course.

Is freediving safe?

Is freediving safe?
Just like many other sports, freediving is very safe, if practiced correctly. During a freediving course, you will learn the proper breathing techniques, relaxation methods and safety measures to make you a better and more comfortable freediver. Any accidents that occur are usually due to lack of proper training and education.

What gear do I need to freedive?

What gear do I need to freedive?
Freediving is certainly much less equipment intensive than scuba diving, for example. All you need to start freediving is a low volume mask, a really simple snorkel, long and flexible fins, a wetsuit and a weight system. You can also consider purchasing some accessories, such as a marker buoy, a safety lanyard, and a knife.

What is apnea?

What is apnea?
The term “apnea” originates from a Greek word A-Pnoia (without breathing) and is generally defined as a suspension of breathing. However, in the modern athletic world apnea has become a synonym of freediving.

What is freediving?

What is freediving?

Freediving is essentially a form of diving when a diver relies on a single breath of air rather than on a breathing apparatus, such as used in scuba diving. The term freediving can, however, be associated with a variety of underwater activities ranging from competitive breath-hold diving to simple shallow dives around reefs and rocks. The activity that attracts the most public attention is the extreme sport of competitive apnea in which competitors attempt to attain great depths, times, or distances on a single breath.

Remember, even though freediving may seem like a simple activity that anyone can do, it is important to take a course to ensure the diver’s safety.

What’s the difference between snorkeling and freediving?

What’s the difference between snorkeling and freediving?
While somewhat similar, snorkeling and freediving have some notable differences. Snorkelers float on the surface of the water with their face submerged and use a mask and snorkel to observe the marine life. Freediving, on the other hand, allows you to dive deep under the water and interact with the environment.