Underwater Lenses, Ports and Lens Gear

style="text-align: justify;">Your underwater photography toolset wouldn’t be complete without a bunch of different lenses and color filters for your camera to capture the beauty of the underwater world more masterfully. Experiment with different Underwater Camera Lens types. Try a wide-angle lens to photograph the big scene and give the viewer a sense of presence. Go with the fisheye lens to get as close as possible to the large subjects. Want to feature tiny sea creatures? Use the macro lens for the highest precision. Apply various color filters to make your photos more vibrant. Combine your creativity and skill with the right set of tools and you will be able to shoot truly magnificent pictures!

 

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Generally, it is best to start with at least one wide-angle lens and one macro lens. However, if you are on a tight budget, get your favorite type first (wide-angle, macro, video, fashion, etc.) and upgrade as you feel like it. If you have little experience in underwater photography and are choosing your first lense, it is usually advisable to go for a wide-angle one. It is an easier form of photography that allows shooting a variety of subjects.

For your wide-angle shots you can buy a fisheye lens or a rectilinear ultra-wide-angle lens. The most notable difference between the two is that the fisheye makes straight lines bend in a circular fashion, while the ultra-wide-angle lens does not create such barrel distortion. This doesn’t mean, however, there is no distortion at all. The rectilinear perspective will cause objects to appear increasingly stretched and enlarged as they near the edge of the frame.

As for the lenses that you regularly use above water, the majority of them prove to be rather inconvenient, inadequate or even useless underwater. It is also not advisable to buy one general all-purpose underwater lense.